Avoiding Coworking Conundrums – What Are Unwritten Rules Of Coworking?

 

Most spaces have them, and if you have been coworking for a few years, you are very well-versed in coworking space etiquette. Coworking has been around for a while, and when fellow professionals put their best face forward, the coworking space becomes professional space. It is easy to see why professionals become guilty of the million little faux pas that can happen in the coworking space because the workspace is so comfortable.

In the UK, these workspace etiquette slips show up when professionals speak too loudly and chatter too incessantly as if it were tea time and leave opened containers of food in the workspace. Worse yet, professionals who commandeer the much-valued conference rooms are also a bit of annoyance. Many times, we are unaware that we have even broken a rule because of the friendly nature of the coworking space, but it happens – and a lot.

Let’s take a closer look at some of the most egregious faux pas in the coworking space and how to avoid them.

 

Appreciate The Support Staff

Most coworking spaces are fit out with support staff that make working in the space much easier. Whether it is a receptionist or other secretarial support, they are usually in the office to take care of details related to the whole office. For example, Servcorp’s London office is a great example of coworking space with office space, as seen in the following link http://www.servcorp.co.uk/en/coworking/.

The coworking space provides businesses with this support because having someone to take care of light tasks can make a business run smoothly for everyone. However, overwhelming office staff with your personal work can interfere with how the space runs for the rest of the community. Be considerate of the support staff and avoid treating them like your personal staff. If you are not sure about the tasks support staff is responsible for, ask space managers and they can give you a list of appropriate tasks.

 

No, Names Are Not Written On Workspace

While it is in our nature to become very territorial, shared workspace is space available to everyone in the coworking community. If not leasing a dedicated desk or a private office, then the seats at the hot desks are available on a first-come-first-serve basis. If your seat happens to be occupied, pick another seat or wait until the one you want becomes available, but avoid angrily glowering at your coworking mates to get them to move.

 

Workspace Food Rules

Most offices have a space to eat and to work. Food items can get messy around areas where people typically work. Grease spots and other stains can make it gross to work in and difficult for others who come behind you in the workspace. If the food is not a small snack, consider moving lunch to one of the designated areas, which typically is the lounge, staff eating areas, or café.

In the staff lounge, avoid behaviours that leave the kitchen untidy. This means not leaving dirty dishes in the sink or old food in the refrigerator. To avoid contributing to workspace untidiness, a good idea would be to always clean up after yourself, even when you are at your busiest.

Respect The Workspace

Finally, good business etiquette dictates that there are standards for behaviour within the areas where business takes place. Behaviours such as sitting on desks, gross displays of PDA, and loud conversations are unprofessional, and not only can be distracting, but also convey attitudes about your professionalism.

Coworking Harmony

Shared space requires a certain amount of compromise. Because the office really is a diverse mix of personalities, professionals have to take it upon themselves to make sure they are not imposing on others in the space. It is possible to achieve coworking harmony, though, if each individual is mindful of their part in making the space comfortable.

 

 

 

 

 

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