How to Make Your Child’s Bedtime Less of a Nightmare

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Any parent knows the nightly chore of getting the children to not only go to bed but to stay there. There are few things worse, than a child who does not want to go to sleep or one who gets up during the night on a regular basis, disturbing everyone else in the house. Establishing an effective bedroom routine can not be overstated and Children’s Bed Shop know the importance of getting a great night’s sleep.

Here are just a few simple ways you can ensure both you and your children get the night-time rest they and you need.

 

Know Your Child

Not everyone needs the same amount of sleep. Even children have varying sleep patterns, and understanding just how much rest your child needs is an essential step to establishing a successful bedtime.

Like adults, some children are early risers who will wake up at the crack of dawn even if they only go to bed at midnight. Others are night owls, thriving late at night – so sending them to bed straight after supper is unlikely to be a success.

Although it is important to ensure your child gets enough sleep, appropriate to their age, it is better to set individual bedtimes according to their needs. Every child is different and must be treated as such.

 

Stick With It

Once you have set a bedtime for your child, make sure you stick to it. Unless there’s a good reason to stay up late (for instance, a family party), your child should go to bed at a set time, even at the weekends.

This will ensure they get the right amount of sleep every day and also helps their body clock to stay constant, meaning they are less likely to wake during the night or have trouble getting up in the morning.

 

Routines Are Good

Try to establish a soothing bedtime routine could include a hot drink followed by a bath, teeth-brushing, story reading and then lights out.

Having a regular routine is particularly important for younger children, who need to be guided as to how to manage their time. Older children can probably be trusted to make their own routine, though do keep an eye on them!

 

Turn Off the Screens

Numerous studies have proved that watching screens – including TVs, laptops and mobiles – can disrupt sleep patterns and even stop you dropping off in the first place.

It is best to turn off the television an hour before bedtime and ensure that older children are not looking at their computers or mobiles in the bedroom. Find other ways for them to relax just before sleep, such as reading or playing gentle games.

 

No Distractions

As well as turning off electronic devices before bedtime, experts advise not giving children too many toys, cuddly or otherwise, in their beds. A beloved teddy or other cuddly toy is fine to cling on to while drifting off to sleep, but too many stuffed animals can be distracting.

 

Create the Right Atmosphere

It is important to decorate and furnish your children’s rooms in a way which will soothe and calm them – not over-excite and stimulate them at the wrong time of day.

Calming colours, such as pastels – particularly greens and light blues – plus soft furnishings, comfy chairs and rugs with soft lighting will all help create a gentle atmosphere conducive to sleeping.

Avoid bright colours, unless in small doses, and keep stimulating toys well away from the bed itself. You may also want to put blackout curtains on the windows or install a dimmer switch to create a more relaxing feeling.

 

Type of Bed

One of the most effective ways of getting your child into bed is making it a bed they actually want to get into. Children love ‘special’ beds, made just for them, and a Julian Bowen mid sleeper will make them feel extra grown-up. Midsleepers are a great  way to get your children excited for bedtime as they can have added extra’s to make it unique for each child.

Whatever type of bed you choose, make sure it’s big enough and comfortable, so they won’t want to get out of it in a hurry.

If your child is not getting enough sleep, it causes problems for the whole family. Not only will they be more prone to misbehaving, but their schoolwork could suffer and their moods too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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