How to Recognise the Signs That Suggest It’s Time for Assisted Living

Senior and young holding hands

 

 

When a parent gets too old to live unaided, the common assumption is that they need to be put into a care home facility. This is not necessarily the case. There are all kinds of other options that might be more suitable. For instance, aged care packages provide services that are delivered within a chosen residence.

They are designed to help elderly people remain in their own homes for as long as it is physically and mentally safe for them to do so. With the support of a home care package provider, the urgency that is often associated with growing old can be allayed. If the individual in question is mostly mobile but requires regular assistance with cleaning the house, shopping, and cooking, it could be the right choice.

This guide to assisted living will help you recognise some of the signs that say it’s time for your parent to get a little bit of help with daily activities.

 

They Forget Things

This is likely to start as seemingly trivial occurrences. After all, everybody forgets to pay a bill or loses track of their keys sometimes. If it is something a little more serious, <a href=”http://www.dementiacareaustralia.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=119&Itemid=81″ rel=”dofollow>the incidents will become frequent and start to disrupt their daily life. For example, they may get warning letters from a utility company about unpaid bills. They might forget to take their medication. They might even leave the house and get lost in a place that should be familiar.

 

They Struggle with Mobility

This is one of the clearest indications that some form of assisted living is needed. If an elderly struggles to move around the house unaided (they wobble on stairs or find the bathroom too slippery), it can be really risky to take no action. Speak with your parent directly and discuss your concerns; most of the time, older people are relieved that somebody has noticed and is keen to help them find a solution.

 

They Are Losing Weight

Sometimes, losing weight is just a part of getting older and frailer. Other times, it is a sign that a parent is not eating in the right way. Even older people who don’t have degenerative conditions like dementia can find it tough to stay healthy. Food shopping is a major physical chore when you’re at an advanced age and then you’ve got to prepare the ingredients, stand at the stove for long periods, and reach up and bend down to access cupboards. It is no surprise that many elderly parents have trouble sticking to a healthy diet when living alone.

 

They Are Becoming Reclusive

Retreating from social engagements isn’t necessarily a sign of cognitive or emotional problems, but it can be and you should make an effort to find out why your parent is staying home more often. If they used to meet friends and keep appointments, but now they make excuses to skip, ask them how they’re feeling. It might be that they’re feeling less stable than they used to and it has left them scared to risk a fall.

 

Bruises, Scratches, or Burns

Obviously, any sign of injury is going to raise alarm bells, but don’t jump to conclusions and panic too quickly. Older people who are frequently burning themselves while cooking, falling on the stairs, or acquiring other minor injuries could probably benefit from an at home carer. This is only a suitable option, however, if you can be sure that it’s safe for them to be alone in the house when the care provider clocks off for the night.

 

Why Opening Up and Speaking Out Can Be a Big Help

It is often a mistake to assume that you can’t talk to your parent about your worries. Most elderly people, even if they don’t like having to accept help, are glad that they won’t have to put themselves at risk anymore. They usually know full well that they’re struggling and that stubbornness is only going to make their lives harder. So, it is worth having the conversation and opening up a discussion early; give your parent the chance to share their opinion.

 

 

 

 

 

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